4 Simple Tips: Eliminate Writer’s Block for Good

4 Simple Tips: Eliminate Writer’s Block for Good

Writer's Block Uncovered

Writer’s block sucks! That’s to put it mildly. It hits us at the worst time and lingers just to agitate us further. Very often it appears when we are under great deadlines.

The pressure only serves to make it worst. Looking at the blank computer screen or sheet of paper only worsens the problem. You need words and you need them fast.

So, why can’t you get started? A lot of people believe that writer’s block comes from an inability to think of the right thing to say.  Actually, writer’s block is more often about fear than it is about a lack of words.

The fear of saying the wrong thing, or of making grammatical errors, or even of sounding unknowledgeable about a subject.

Heck, in writing this article alone I’ve probably made several compound errors and countless run-ons. Fear is the number one problem. So what’s the solution? First let me clear a few things up.

The Myth About Writer's Block

First, let me dispel the myth. You do not need to be a spelling champion. Nor, do you need to be an expert in grammar to write.  Also, don’t be afraid of commas, colons, hyphens, or the dreaded ellipsis.

If you don’t know how to use them, don’t worry. Writing is easier than you think. Just make it simple. 

Start by writing at your own comfort level. Don’t worry. No one will laugh at you for expressing your thoughts and slowly but surely, your grammar will improve.

If you do have issues with grammar, I have two suggestions. One, pick up “The only grammar book you’ll ever need” by Susan Thurman here.

This book is small but powerful. It will help you in the editing stages. Second, one of my favorite sites for grammar help is Grammarly. The more you use the site the better you’ll become.

Also, keep in mind that the best way to become a good writer is by writing. So, write as much as possible.

Second, if you’re worried that your knowledge level is not up to par, start researching. The internet is a mega resource for learning.

Anything you ever wanted to know, or find is located online. Spend some time learning all about your topic, but be careful. The internet is also crawling with false information, make sure to verify your sources. 

Once you’ve gathered up your pearls of wisdom, you are now a semi-expert. Using that information is a great way to up your credibility and become an authority on the subject.

Just remember that if you use that information, you must give credit where credit is due. It’s called citing your source.

You do this by adding the source’s web address, author’s name, date, and any other relevant information needed.

If you are not familiar with citations, here is a great link to get you started. There you will find information and a cool citation generator. 

writing

The Grit of Writer's Block

Now that we’ve taken care of all the little things that might hinder our progress. Let’s move back into how to eliminate writer’s block for good.

I have assembled 4 tips that have worked well for me in the past. They’ve helped me to either successfully avoid and even eliminate those blank moments.

Writing is nothing more than talking to someone via the written word. The only difference is you are not actually in the presence of the person.

So, the real question is whether or not you can talk. Because if speaking is not an issue for you, then neither is writing. It’s just mind over matter.

In a matter of speaking.

I am going to show you how to talk to your audience via writing.

women listening


Tip 1. Listen

Listen to a random person speaking. How they emphasize their words. The way they may leave off endings, such as ‘ed or ‘s.

Do they put together words well to form a point. You’ll notice that on the right tongue words can sound like a beautiful symphony.

Just as equally, on the wrong tongue, like a dying cat in a back alley whaling in pain. Just plain frightening!

As a writer, it is your job to listen. In time, you will learn to develop your ears to become more receptive to incorrect speech.

The tiniest of misspoken words will catch your notice. Once you’ve trained your ears and mind to listen for those errors.

You will be well on your way to developing stronger speech patterns. This will, in turn, improve your writing skills.

business coaching


Tip 2. Picture It

Picture your target audience standing directly in front of you. Now you are no longer writing, but speaking to someone.

Your chosen audience.

If your not sure how your audience is I would suggest doing a little soul search prior to this exercise.

If you do have a target group in mind, please continue. Focus on the conversation you would be having with your target group.

Everything you would like to say to these people and how you would like to say it.

Think about the inflections in your voice when you speak, the tone you use, and the words you chose to deliver your message as a speaker.

Now, take exactly what you said in your mind and write it down. Don’t worry about grammar for now. Just write! Oh, and don’t let the blank screen scare you.

 

writer with no writer's block


Tip 3. Expose Yourself

Write like no ones watching. Skip the grammar police. Forget about your English teacher. Don’t worry about your mother correcting your every word.

Just write!

Write out your every thought and feeling. Don’t worry about how it reads. Just focus on getting words on the screen that is right from your heart.

Leave the drama for later. The great thing about being an artist is freedom.

Authors are word artist, and we do not do well under restrictions. So, set your creativity free and shine. If you are not a word master yet, don’t worry.

Pick up a dictionary and make it your friend. I suggest learning at least one new word a day.

After one year you would have mastered 365 new words to add to your library. Imagine in 5 years time that number would reach 1825 new words.

You could write a novel with that kind of library with no problem.

 
 
frog in tub


Tip 4. Rinse & Repeat

Read, Edit, Read Edit. Now, that you have a few words on the screen or paper, let’s talk about refining.

Remember earlier when I told you earlier to forget about grammar, well it’s time to remember. Grammar is a necessary evil.

Yes, it can be hard to navigate, but it’s crucial to communicating effectively.

To start, read every paragraph at least ten times. Search for errors in spelling and grammar as you search. 

Make sure your sentence structures are right. Also, make sure your thought pattern flows from one paragraph to another. Jumbled thoughts scattered about a page is frustrating to the reader.

My advice is to take one section at a time and review it for errors. Once done, move on to the next section.

Do this until the entire article/book is easy to read and understand. I’m not saying you’ll catch every error.

I know I sure don’t, but it’s good practice. If you need help remember to use the grammar sites mentioned earlier.

 
 

Authors Notes

Read, Edit, Read Edit. Now, that you have a few words on the screen or paper, let’s talk about refining.

Remember earlier when I told you earlier to forget about grammar, well it’s time to remember.

Grammar is a necessary evil.

Yes, it can be hard to navigate, but it’s crucial to communicating effectively.

To start, read every paragraph at least ten times. Search for errors in spelling and grammar as you search.  Make sure your sentence structures are right.

 
Also, make sure your thought pattern flows from one paragraph to another. Jumbled thoughts scattered about a page is frustrating to the reader.
 

My advice is to take one section at a time and review it for errors. Once done, move on to the next section.

Do this until the entire article/book is easy to read and understand. I’m not saying you’ll catch every error.

I know I sure don’t, but it’s good practice. If you need help remember to use the grammar sites mentioned earlier.

All images sourced from Pixabay.com


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Tamiko Williams

Tamiko is the CEO and managing member of a technologies company who possesses over 20 years’ experience in management, technology, and coaching. She holds two degrees in business and development along with a master’s degree in computer science. She is a true egalitarian dedicating her life to helping others achieve their dreams.

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